How many GZZTs
can your brain resists?

._|.<(+_+)>.|_.

Latest and Breaking Archaeology News

Nature has more than one way to grow a crystal
(Virginia Tech) The findings in the journal Science have implications for questions regarding how animals and plants grow minerals into shapes that have no relation to their original crystal symmetry, and why some contaminants are difficult to remove from stream sediments.

Chemistry of tattoos (video)
(American Chemical Society) If you don't have a tattoo, you probably at least know someone who does -- but what's the chemistry behind tattoos? In this Reactions video we explore what tattoo ink is made of, why this body art is permanent (whether you like it or not) and other cool facts. Check it out here: https://youtu.be/Fs9rR4W0EeA.

'Carbon sink' detected underneath world's deserts
(American Geophysical Union) The world's deserts may be storing some of the climate-changing carbon dioxide emitted by human activities, a new study suggests. Massive aquifers underneath deserts could hold more carbon than all the plants on land, according to the new research.

Past and present genomes tell the story of Native American biological origins
(Carl R. Woese Institute for Genomic Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign) A study by multi-institutional, international collaboration of researchers, published this week in Science presents strong evidence, gleaned from ancient and modern DNA samples, that the ancestry of all Native Americans can be traced back to a single migration event, with subsequent gene flow between some groups and populations that are currently located in East Asia and Australia.

New research on the causes of the Viking Age
(University of York) The Viking hit-and-run raids on monastic communities such as Lindisfarne and Iona were the most infamous result of burgeoning Scandinavian maritime prowess in the closing years of the 8th century. These skirmishes led to more expansive military campaigns, settlement, and ultimately conquest of large swathes of the British Isles. But Dr. Steve Ashby, of the Department of Archaeology at the University of York, wanted to explore the social justifications for this spike in aggressive activity.

Study finds abrupt climate change may have rocked the cradle of civilization
(University of Miami Rosenstiel School of Marine & Atmospheric Science) New research reveals that some of the earliest civilizations in the Middle East and the Fertile Crescent may have been affected by abrupt climate change. These findings show that while socio-economic factors were traditionally considered to shape ancient human societies in this region, the influence of abrupt climate change should not be underestimated.

Small oxygen jump helped enable early animals take first breaths
(Virginia Tech) Measurements of iron speciation in ancient rocks were used to construct the chemistry of ancient oceans. Analysis suggests that it took less oxygen than previously thought to trigger the appearance of complicated life forms.

Are invisibility cloaks possible? (video)
(American Chemical Society) Have you ever wished you could hide under an invisibility cloak like Harry Potter or conceal your car with a Klingon cloaking device like in Star Trek? In a special Thursday bonus episode of Reactions, we celebrate the International Year of Light by exploring the science behind light, sight and invisibility. Though we can't make ourselves invisible yet, some promising research may light the way -- or rather, bend the light away. Check it out here: http://youtu.be/sN70Bgm_PAQ.

What killed off the megafauna?
(American Association for the Advancement of Science) Rapid phases of warming climate played a greater role in the extinction of megafauna in the Late Pleistocene than did human activity, a new study shows.

Mammoths killed by abrupt climate change
(University of Adelaide) New research has revealed abrupt warming, that closely resembles the rapid man-made warming occurring today, has repeatedly played a key role in mass extinction events of large animals, the megafauna, in Earth's past.

Did you find this helpful?

Gzzt.org is an honest, human-edited directory of free online services and useful sites. We are about to celebrate 20 years in Internet. We would be very happy if you buy us a coffee.

Thank you!


{top}