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Latest and Breaking Biology News

UTSW assistant professor chosen for $1.5 million Data-Driven Discovery award from Gordon
(UT Southwestern Medical Center) Dr. Kimberly Reynolds, Assistant Professor in the Cecil H. and Ida Green Comprehensive Center for Molecular, Computational, and Systems Biology and in the Department of Biophysics at University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, has been named one of 14 Moore Investigators in Data-Driven Discovery.

NJIT hosts the NJ mayors' Summit on Resilient Design
(New Jersey Institute of Technology) Local mayors and state and federal experts will gather at New Jersey Institute of Technology to discuss how the state has recovered from two of the worst natural disasters ever to hit New Jersey: Hurricanes Sandy and Irene.

Some like it loud
(National Evolutionary Synthesis Center (NESCent)) Species of poison frogs that utilize bright warning coloration as protection from predators are more likely to develop louder, more complex calls than relatives that rely on camouflage. New research indicates that because these visual cues establish certain species as unsavory prey, they are free to make noisy calls in plain sight and better attract possible mates.

Law of the Sea authorizes animal tagging research without nations' consent
(Duke University) Scientists who study migratory marine animals can rarely predict where the animals' paths will lead. In a new paper, Duke researchers argue that coastal nations don't have precedent under the law of the sea to require scientists to seek advance permission to remotely track tagged animals who may enter their waters. Requiring advance consent undermines the goals of the law, which is meant to encourage scientific research for conservation of marine animals.

New study finds options for climate change policy are well characterized
(American Meteorological Society) Policy options for climate change risk management are straightforward and have well understood strengths and weaknesses, according to a new study by the American Meteorological Society Policy Program.

RIT student wins coveted SMART Scholarship from Department of Defense
(Rochester Institute of Technology) Kyle Crompton, a doctoral student at the Rochester Institute of Technology, was recently awarded a prestigious SMART scholarship from the U.S. Department of Defense. SMART -- the Science, Mathematics and Research for Transformation 'Scholarship for Service' Program -- awards scholarships to students pursuing advanced degrees in STEM fields. Upon graduation these scholars are hired as research staff at defense laboratories around the country to increase the number of civilian scientists and engineers in this capacity.

New hope for drug discovery in African sleeping sickness
(Northeastern University) The neglected trop­ical dis­ease affects tens of thou­sands of people and is mostly fatal. Now, new research co-​​authored by North­eastern chem­istry pro­fessor Michael Pol­lastri has iden­ti­fied hun­dreds of chem­ical com­pounds that could lead to a cure.

Clues to genetics of congenital heart defects emerge from Down syndrome study
(Emory Health Sciences) The largest genetic study of congenital heart defects in individuals with Down syndrome found a connection to rare, large genetic deletions affecting cilia.

New findings will improve the sex lives of women with back problems
(University of Waterloo) Newly published findings from the University of Waterloo are giving women with bad backs renewed hope for better sex lives. The findings -- part of the first-ever study to document how the spine moves during sex -- outline which sex positions are best for women suffering from different types of low-back pain. The new recommendations follow on the heels of comparable guidelines for men released last month.

CDC charges Johns Hopkins to lead development of Ebola training module
(Johns Hopkins Medicine) Johns Hopkins Medicine has been tasked by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to lead a group and to design an interactive Web-based learning program that guides health care workers, nurses and physicians through government-approved protocols to aid clinicians as they provide care to patients who may be at risk of contracting the Ebola virus. The program trains health care providers in three critical areas: proper donning of personal protective equipment, the safe removal of gear and active monitoring skills.

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