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Health, Science & Technology News

Moffitt Cancer Center's phase 3 study may be game-changer for acute myeloid leukemia
Moffitt Cancer Center researchers say clinical trials for a new experimental drug to treat acute myeloid leukemia are very promising. Patients treated with CPX-351, a combination of the chemotherapeutic drugs cytarabine and daunorubicin, are showing better responses than patients treated with the standard drug formulation.

Pregnancy complications may be more common in immigrants from certain regions
Pregnant immigrants from Sub-Saharan Africa, Latin America and Caribbean islands may require increased monitoring during pregnancy, according to new research from St. Michael's Hospital.

Pilot study suggests ways to widen access to fecal transplants for C. diff infections
Using frozen stool from healthy, unrelated donors was safe and effective in treating patients with serious, relapsing diarrhea caused by Clostridium difficile, according to a new pilot study published in Clinical Infectious Diseases and available online. Known as fecal microbiota transplantation, the treatment was equally effective whether given via a colonoscope or a nasogastric tube. The findings suggest approaches that may make this promising treatment more readily available to patients.

Use of frozen material for fecal transplant successfully treats C. difficile infection
A pilot study by Massachusetts General Hospital investigators may lead to greater availability and acceptability of an unusual treatment for a serious medical problem -- use of fecal material from healthy donors to treat recurrent diarrhea caused by the Clostridium difficile bacteria. The researchers report that use of prescreened frozen material from donors unrelated to patients was as successful in curing recurrent C. difficile as was the use of fresh fecal material reported in previous studies.

WSU innovation improves drowsy driver detection
Researchers at Washington State University Spokane have developed a new way to detect when drivers are about to nod off behind the wheel.

NASA satellites show drought may take toll on Congo rainforest
A new analysis of NASA satellite data shows Africa's Congo rainforest, the second-largest tropical rainforest in the world, has undergone a large-scale decline in greenness over the past decade.

Princeton release: Not just the poor live hand-to-mouth
Thirty to 40 percent of US households live hand-to-mouth, but work by researchers at Princeton and New York University found that most of those people aren't poor.

Rural microbes could boost city dwellers' health
The greater prevalence of asthma, allergies and other chronic inflammatory disorders among people of lower socioeconomic status might be due in part to their reduced exposure to the microbes that thrive in rural environments, according to a new scientific paper.

Study: Iron consumption can increase risk for heart disease
A new study from the Indiana University School of Public Health-Bloomington has bolstered the link between red meat consumption and heart disease by finding a strong association between heme iron, found only in meat, and potentially deadly coronary heart disease.

Male or female?
The Y chromosome, which distinguishes males from females at the genetic level, appeared some 180 million years ago. It originated twice independently in all mammals. The team of professor Henrik Kaessmann at the Center for Integrative Genomics and the SIB Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics managed to date these events that are crucial for both mammalian evolution and our lives, because the Y chromosome determines whether we are born as a boy or girl. The results of this research have just been published in Nature.

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