How many GZZTs
can your brain resists?

._|.<(+_+)>.|_.

Health, Science & Technology News

Sagebrush ecosystem recovery hobbled by loss of soil complexity at development sites
In big sagebrush country, re-establishing the ecosystem's namesake shrub may jump-start the recovery process more successfully after oil and gas development than sowing grass-dominated reclamation seed mixes typically used to quickly re-vegetate bare soil on well pads, report two Colorado scientists in the Jan. 2015 issue of Ecological Applications.

Ads effective even in the midst of multitasking, studies find
Those video ads playing in the corner of your computer screen, in the midst of multitasking, may have more impact than you realize. They may be as effective as ads you're really watching, says University of Illinois advertising professor Brittany Duff. It depends on how you perceive and process media content -- whether your processing 'style' is to focus more on one thing or to take it all in. It also may depend on your mood.

NOAA's DSCOVR going to a 'far out' orbit
Many satellites that monitor the Earth orbit relatively close to the planet, while some satellites that monitor the sun orbit our star. DSCOVR will keep an eye on both, with a focus on the sun. To cover both the Earth and sun, it will have an unusual orbit in a place called L1.

Penn research shows relationship critical for how cells ingest matter
To survive and fulfill their biological functions, cells need to take in material from their environment. In this process, proteins within the cell pull inward on its membrane, forming a pit that eventually encapsulates the material in a bubble called a vesicle. Researchers from the University of Pennsylvania have now revealed a relationship that governs this process, known as endocytosis.

Hospitals helping violence victims could save millions
In the first systematic look at the economic outcomes of hospital-based violence intervention, Drexel researchers demonstrate that, in addition to transforming victims' lives, these programs may indeed save a significant amount of money compared to non-intervention, in various sectors including health care and criminal justice, up to about $4 million to serve 90 clients in a 5-year period.

Researchers at Penn, UC Berkeley and Illinois use oxides to flip graphene conductivity
A team of researchers from the University of Pennsylvania; University of California, Berkeley; and University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign has demonstrated a new way to change the amount of electrons that reside in a given region within a piece of graphene, they have a proof-of-principle in making the fundamental building blocks of semiconductor devices using the 2-D material.

Satellite witnesses developing US nor'easter
National Weather Service forecasters have been tracking a low pressure area that moved from the Midwest into the Atlantic Ocean today, and is expected to become a strong nor'easter that will bring blizzard conditions to the northeastern US The path of the system was captured in a NASA movie of NOAA's GOES-East satellite imagery.

Beating the clock: UGA researchers develop new treatment for rabies
Successfully treating rabies can be a race against the clock. Those who suffer a bite from a rabid animal have a brief window of time to seek medical help before the virus takes root in the central nervous system, at which point the disease is almost invariably fatal.Now, researchers at the University of Georgia have successfully tested a treatment on mice that cures the disease even after the virus has spread to the brain.

UGA researchers image and measure tubulin transport in cilia
A new study from the University of Georgia, published in the Journal of Cell Biology, shows the mechanism behind tubulin transport and its assembly into cilia, including the first video imagery of the process. "Cilia are found throughout the body, so defects in cilia formation affect cells that line airways, brain ventricles or the reproductive track," said the study's lead author Julie Craft.

Engineering self-assembling amyloid fibers
Nature has many examples of self-assembly, and bioengineers are interested in copying these systems to create useful new materials or devices. Amyloid proteins, for example, can self-assemble into the tangled plaques associated with Alzheimer's disease -- but can also form very useful materials, such as spider silk, or biofilms around living cells. Researchers at UC Davis and Rice University have now come up with methods to manipulate natural proteins so that they self-assemble into amyloid fibrils.

Did you find this helpful?

Gzzt.org is an honest, human-edited directory of free online services and useful sites. We are about to celebrate 20 years in Internet. We would be very happy if you buy us a coffee.

Thank you!


{top}