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Latest and Breaking Business Science News

Scalping can raise ticket prices
(USC Marshall School of Business) A new study by Victor Bennett, assistant professor of management and organization at the USC Marshall School of Business, along with colleagues at New York University and the Harvard Business School, finds that resale markets like Craigslist can add value to tickets sold by concert venues and Ticketmaster.

UT Arlington geophysicist awarded federal funds to study rock dynamics
(University of Texas at Arlington) W. Ashley Griffith, an assistant professor of earth and environmental sciences, said the new research could give the Army information on how to address hardened and deeply buried targets, but the results could also easily be applied to improving civil engineering methods. The new grant also relates to Griffith's ongoing research using the latest technology to explore the science of earthquakes and a phenomenon in rocks known as 'rate-strengthening.'

ASA launches national Perioperative Surgical Home learning collaborative
(American Society of Anesthesiologists) The American Society of Anesthesiologists® (ASA®) today announced the launch of its ASA Perioperative Surgical Home (PSH) Learning Collaborative, a national initiative designed to improve the patient experience before, during and after surgery. More than 40 leading health care organizations from across the country will participate in the collaborative, which will convene for the first time at the ASA's PSH Learning Collaborative Launch, July 25-26, in Schaumburg, Ill.

University of Houston researcher publishes textbook on tissue engineering
(University of Houston) Ravi Birla, associate professor of biomedical engineering at the University of Houston, has published his first book, 'Introduction to Tissue Engineering: Applications and Challenges.' The book offers a comprehensive guide to entering the field of artificial organ development.

New licensing agreement could improve treatment options for children living with HIV
(Elizabeth Glaser Pediatric AIDS Foundation) The Elizabeth Glaser Pediatric AIDS Foundation applauds the new licensing agreement between the Medicines Patent Pool and Gilead Sciences, Inc. to improve access to tenofovir alafenamide fumarate, a promising new HIV medication. The agreement was announced during the 20th International AIDS Conference in Melbourne, Australia. While tenofovir alafenamide fumarate is still in Phase III clinical trials, early data suggests it could be a key ingredient in the next generation of first-line fixed-dose treatment options for children living with HIV.

Is Europe putting cancer research at risk?
(European Society for Medical Oncology) The European Society for Medical Oncology has expressed concern that the proposed EU General Data Protection Regulation could make cancer research impossible and add a significant burden to both doctors and cancer patients.

Informed consent: False positives not a worry in lung cancer study
(Brown University) A new study of participants in the National Lung Screening Trial finds that a false positive screen result -- a screening test in which initial findings of concern for cancer are later found not to be worrisome -- did not cause participants undue anxiety or reduced quality of life. Researchers hypothesize that clear and accurate consent forms prepared patients for these false positive diagnoses.

Zerenex (ferric citrate) long-term Phase 3 study results published in JASN
(Edelman) Keryx Biopharmaceuticals Inc. announced the publication of results from the long-term, randomized, active control Phase 3 study of Zerenex (ferric citrate), the Company's investigational oral ferric iron-based phosphate binder, for the treatment of hyperphosphatemia in patients with end-stage renal disease on dialysis. The PERFECTED study (PhosphatE binding and iRon delivery with FErric CiTrate in EsrD) was published online today in the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

Study indicates large raptors in Africa used for bushmeat
(Zoological Society of San Diego) Bushmeat, the use of native animal species for food or commercial food sale, has been heavily documented to be a significant factor in the decline of many species of primates and other mammals. However, a new study indicates that more than half of the species being consumed are birds, particularly large birds like raptors and hornbills.

TGen-led study seeks to understand why some HIV-positive men are more infectious
(The Translational Genomics Research Institute) A new study led by the Translational Genomics Research Institute provides insights into the interplay among bacteria, viruses and the immune system during HIV infection.

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