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Latest and Breaking Chemistry & Physics News

Stronger action needed to transform the UK's energy system
(University College London) An ambitious policy package is essential for the UK to transform its energy system to achieve the deep reductions in carbon emissions required to avoid dangerous climate change, according to research led by UCL scientists. To meet climate targets set for 2050, policies need to ensure strong action is taken now, while preparing for fundamental changes in how energy is provided and used in the long term.

Second-line cetuximab active beyond progression in quadruple wild-type patients with mCRC
(European Society for Medical Oncology) Patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) that are mutation-free in the KRAS, NRAS, BRAF and PIK3CA genes showed significant benefit from continuing anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) therapy beyond progression following first-line chemotherapy and an anti-EGFR monoclonal antibody, according to study results presented at the ESMO 17th World Congress on Gastrointestinal Cancer in Barcelona, Spain.

A 'movie' of ultrafast rotating molecules at a hundred billion per second
(National Institutes of Natural Sciences) Can you imagine how subnano-scale molecules make an ultrafast rotation at a hundred billion per second? Do the ultrafast rotating subnano-scale molecules show a wave-like nature rather than particle-like behavior? The Japanese research team led by Professor Yasuhiro Ohshima at the Tokyo Institute of Technology, and Dr. Kenta Mizuse at the Institute for Molecular Science, National Institutes of Natural Sciences, successfully took sequential 'snapshots' of ultrafast unidirectionally rotating molecules at a hundred billion per second.

'Invisible' protein structure explains the power of enzymes
(Umea University) A research group at Ume University in Sweden has managed to capture and describe a protein structure that, until now, has been impossible to study. The discovery lays the base for developing designed enzymes as catalysts to new chemical reactions for instance in biotechnological applications. The result of the study is published in the journal Nature Communications.

Early exposure to cat urine makes mice less likely to escape from cats
(Society for Experimental Biology) Mice that are exposed to the powerful smell of cat urine early in life do not escape from cats later in life. Researchers at the A. N. Severtsov Institute of Ecology and Evolution, Russia, have discovered that mice that smell cat urine early in life, do not avoid the same odor, and therefore do not escape from their feline predators, later in life.

Studies confirm regorafenib benefit in pre-treated metastatic colorectal cancer
(European Society for Medical Oncology) The phase IIIb CONSIGN study has confirmed the benefit of regorafenib in patients with previously treated metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC), researchers announced at the ESMO 17th World Congress on Gastrointestinal Cancer 2015 in Barcelona. The safety profile and progression free survival were similar to phase III trial results.

REM sleep critical for young brain development; medication interferes
(Washington State University) Rapid eye movement or REM sleep actively converts waking experiences into lasting memories and abilities in young brains reports a new study from Washington State University Spokane. The finding, published in Science Advances, broadens the understanding of children's sleep needs and calls into question the increasing use of REM-disrupting medications such as stimulants and antidepressants.

Astronomers predict fireworks from rare stellar encounter in 2018
(NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center) Astronomers are gearing up for high-energy fireworks coming in early 2018, when a stellar remnant the size of a city meets one of the brightest stars in our galaxy.

Seahorse tails could inspire new generation of robots
(Clemson University) Inspiration for the next big technological breakthrough in robotics, defense systems and biomedicine could come from a seahorse's tail, according to a new study reported Thursday in the journal Science.The research centers on the curious shape of seahorse tails and was led by Clemson University's Michael M. Porter, an assistant professor of mechanical engineering.

Long-term memories are maintained by prion-like proteins
(Columbia University Medical Center) Research from Eric Kandel's lab has uncovered further evidence of a system in the brain that persistently maintains memories for long periods of time.

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