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Latest and Breaking Education News

RIT student wins coveted SMART Scholarship from Department of Defense
(Rochester Institute of Technology) Kyle Crompton, a doctoral student at the Rochester Institute of Technology, was recently awarded a prestigious SMART scholarship from the U.S. Department of Defense. SMART -- the Science, Mathematics and Research for Transformation 'Scholarship for Service' Program -- awards scholarships to students pursuing advanced degrees in STEM fields. Upon graduation these scholars are hired as research staff at defense laboratories around the country to increase the number of civilian scientists and engineers in this capacity.

UT Dallas team infuses science into 'Minecraft' modification
(University of Texas at Dallas) The 3-D world of the popular 'Minecraft' video game just became more entertaining, perilous and educational, thanks to a comprehensive code modification kit, 'Polycraft World,' created by UT Dallas professors, students and alumni

APIC Ebola readiness survey findings
(Association for Professionals in Infection Control) Only 6 percent of US hospitals are well-prepared to receive a patient with the Ebola virus, according to a survey of infection prevention experts at US hospitals conducted Oct. 10-15 by the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology.

​NTU and UNESCO to create mini-lab kits for youths in developing countries
(Nanyang Technological University) NTU is partnering the United Nations Organisation for Education, Science and Culture to create mini-laboratory kits for students in high schools and colleges with limited resources or without proper laboratories.

Intervention program helps prevent high-school dropouts
(Arizona State University) New research findings from a team of prevention scientists at Arizona State University demonstrates that a family-focused intervention program for middle-school Mexican American children leads to fewer drop-out rates and lower rates of alcohol and illegal drug use. This research is especially significant since Mexican American youth face significant barriers that lead them to have one of the highest high-school drop-out rates in the nation.

Helping sweet cherries survive the long haul
(American Society for Horticultural Science) Research into the effectiveness of hydrocooling of sweet cherries at commercial packing houses determined the need for post-packing cooling. Analyses determined that core temperatures achieved by in-line hydrocoolers during packing did not reduce temperatures sufficiently to ensure good quality retention over the longer periods of time required for container shipping to export markets. The study recommends forced-air cooling to further reduce sweet cherry temperatures in the box before shipping.

Boston College professor to lead $19 million NIH mentoring network
(Boston College) Boston College Biologist David Burgess and other leaders in the field will develop the National Research Mentoring Network through a five-year, $19 million grant from the NIH to increase diversity within the ranks of the nation's biomedical workforce.

NIH awards Detroit colleges $21.2 million to improve student diversity in biomed research
(Wayne State University - Office of the Vice President for Research) A consortium of Marygrove College, University of Detroit Mercy, Wayne County Community College District and Wayne State University has been awarded $21.2 million over five years by the National Institutes of Health to implement a program encouraging more undergraduate students from underrepresented and economically disadvantaged backgrounds to pursue careers in biomedical research.

Paperwork consumes one-sixth of US physicians' time and erodes morale: Study
(Physicians for a National Health Program) The average US doctor spends 16.6 percent of his or her working hours on non-patient-related paperwork, time that might otherwise be spent caring for patients, according to an analysis of a nationally representative survey of physicians. Current trends in US health policy -- a shift to employment in large practices, the implementation of electronic medical records, and the increasing prevalence of financial risk sharing -- are likely to increase doctors' paperwork burdens and may decrease career satisfaction.

Herbal medicines could contain dangerous levels of toxic mold
(Elsevier) Herbal medicines such as licorice, Indian rennet and opium poppy, are at risk of contamination with toxic mold, according to a new study published in Fungal Biology. The authors of the study, from the University of Peshawar, Pakistan say it's time for regulators to control mold contamination.

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