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Latest and Breaking Mathematics News

Why sibling stars look alike: Early, fast mixing in star-birth clouds
(University of California High-Performance AstroComputing Center) Early, fast, turbulent mixing of gas within giant molecular clouds -- the birthplaces of stars -- means all stars formed from a single cloud bear the same unique chemical 'tag' or 'DNA fingerprint,' write astrophysicists at University of California, Santa Cruz, reporting on the results of computational simulations in the journal Nature, published online on Aug. 31, 2014. Could such chemical tags help astronomers identify our own Sun's long-lost sibling stars?

Inter-dependent networks stress test
(Springer) Energy production systems are good examples of complex systems. Their infrastructure equipment requires ancillary sub-systems structured like a network -- including water for cooling, transport to supply fuel, and ICT systems for control and management. Every step in the network chain is interconnected with a wider network and they are all mutually dependent. Gaihua Fu and colleagues have studied various aspects of inter-network dependencies, not previously explored, and their findings have been published in EPJ B.

Canadians rank highly when it comes to public science knowledge, attitudes, and engagement
(Council of Canadian Academies) A new expert panel report, Science Culture: Where Canada Stands, released today by the Council of Canadian Academies, helps to paint the clearest picture of Canada's science culture and science culture support system in 25 years. The expert panel who conducted the assessment found Canadians excel in public science knowledge, attitudes, and engagement; however they also determined there is room for improvement in some areas, including skills development.

Scientists plug into a learning brain
(NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke) Scientists explored the brain's capacity to learn and found learning is easier when it only requires nerve cells to rearrange existing patterns of activity than when the nerve cells have to generate new patterns.

New smartphone app can detect newborn jaundice in minutes
(University of Washington) University of Washington engineers and physicians have developed a smartphone application that checks for jaundice in newborns and can deliver results to parents and pediatricians within minutes.

Flexing the brain: Why learning tasks can be difficult
(Carnegie Mellon University) Learning a new skill is easier when it is related to an ability we already have. For example, a trained pianist can learn a new melody easier than learning how to hit a tennis serve.Scientists from the Center for the Neural Basis of Cognition -- a joint program between Carnegie Mellon University and the University of Pittsburgh -- have discovered a fundamental constraint in the brain that may explain why this happens.

Researching fundamental rhythms of life
(New Jersey Institute of Technology) Casey Diekman, assistant professor of mathematical sciences at New Jersey Institute of Technology, is helping to gain greater insight into the biological clock that sets the pace for daily life.

Sheepdogs use simple rules to herd sheep
(Natural Environment Research Council) Sheepdogs use just two simple rules to round up large herds of sheep, scientists have discovered.

New process helps overcome obstacles to produce renewable fuels and chemicals
(DOE/National Renewable Energy Laboratory) There's an old saying in the biofuels industry: 'You can make anything from lignin except money.' But now, a new study may pave the way to challenging that adage. The study from the Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory demonstrates a concept that provides opportunities for the successful conversion of lignin into a variety of renewable fuels, chemicals, and materials for a sustainable energy economy.

INFORMS study shows social welfare may fall in a more ethical market
(Institute for Operations Research and the Management Sciences) For 'credence services' such as auto-repair, health care, and legal services, the benefit to the customers for the service is difficult to assess before and even after the service. A new study in a journal of the Institute for Operations Research and the Management Sciences (INFORMS) finds that in a credence services market, when more service providers care about the customer's well-being, society as whole may actually be worse off.

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