How many GZZTs
can your brain resists?

._|.<(+_+)>.|_.

Latest and Breaking Mathematics News

Calculating how the Pacific was settled
(University of Utah) Using statistics that describe how an infectious disease spreads, a University of Utah anthropologist analyzed different theories of how people first settled islands of the vast Pacific between 3,500 and 900 years ago. Adrian Bell found the two most likely strategies were to travel mostly against prevailing winds and seek easily seen islands, not necessarily the nearest islands.

New super-fast MRI technique demonstrated with song 'If I Only Had a Brain'
(Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology) With a new magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique developed at the Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology at the University of Illinois, the vocal neuromuscular movements of singing and speaking can now be captured at 100 frames per second.

Link between respiration and high blood pressure in sleep apnea studied at IUPUI
(Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis School of Science) IUPUI applied mathematician Yaroslav Molkov is developing a computational model to simulate the electrical signals generated by neurons that travel from the brain to the muscles controlling breathing and blood vessels as he looks at the link between respiration and high blood pressure in obstructive sleep apnea.

Likely cause of 2013-14 earthquakes: Combination of gas field fluid injection and removal
(Southern Methodist University) A seismology team led by Southern Methodist University, Dallas, finds that high volumes of wastewater injection combined with saltwater (brine) extraction from natural gas wells is the most likely cause of earthquakes near Azle, Texas, from late 2013 through spring 2014. The team identified two intersecting faults and developed a sophisticated 3-D model to assess changing fluid pressure within a rock formation, and the stress changes induced by both wastewater injection and gas production wells.

Pacific Coast Undergraduate Mathematics Conference honored for achievements
(American Mathematical Society) The Pacific Coast Undergraduate Mathematics Conference has been chosen to receive the 2015 Mathematics Programs that Make a Difference Award from the American Mathematical Society. PCUMC is honored 'for its significant efforts to encourage students from underrepresented groups to continue in the study of mathematics.'

Center for Undergraduate Research in Mathematics honored for achievements
(American Mathematical Society) The Center for Undergraduate Research in Mathematics at Brigham Young University has been chosen to receive the 2015 Mathematics Programs that Make a Difference Award from the American Mathematical Society. CURM is honored 'for its significant efforts to encourage students from underrepresented groups to continue in the study of mathematics.'

Why some neurons 'outsource' their cell body
(Bernstein Coordination Site (BCOS)) Nerve cells come in very different shapes. Researchers at the Bernstein Center Berlin now reveal why, in insects, the cell body is usually located at the end of a separate extension. Using mathematical models, they show that this increases the strength of electrical signal transmission at no additional energetic cost.

Cost-efficiency of plug-in hybrids calculated a thousand times faster
(Chalmers University of Technology) Plug-in hybrids have low fuel consumption, but require more costly parts than cars with a regular combustion engine. During development, the optimal cost balance must be calculated, which has been extremely time consuming to date. Now researchers at Chalmers University of Technology have developed a new method that dramatically reduces the time needed for these calculations.

Expert offers advice on how to 'pitch' a good research idea
(Wiley) For many students or junior academics -- and even for senior investigators -- initiating a new piece of research can be a daunting experience, and they often do not know where or how to begin. A recent Accounting and Finance article offers a simple new research tool that can act as a template designed for pitching research ideas to mentors or other experts.

A somber anniversary: 100 years of chemical weapons (video)
(American Chemical Society) April 22, 2015, marks the 100th anniversary of the first large-scale use of chemical weapons in warfare. Some of the best minds in chemistry at that time, including a Nobel Prize winner, used their knowledge of science to build humanity's new weapons of mass destruction. Reactions presents this sobering look at the chemistry behind the modern world's first chemical weapons. Check out the video here: http://youtu.be/e8W3dOURya0.

Did you find this helpful?

Gzzt.org is an honest, human-edited directory of free online services and useful sites. We are about to celebrate 20 years in Internet. We would be very happy if you buy us a coffee.

Thank you!


{top}