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Latest and Breaking Medical News

Cancer patients should not hesitate to speak with their doctors about dietary supplements
(University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston) Many cancer patients use dietary supplements such as vitamins, minerals and herbs or other botanicals but often don't tell their doctor. This gap in communication can happen when patients believe that their doctors are indifferent or negative toward their use of these supplements. As a result, patients may find information about dietary supplements from unreliable sources, exposing themselves to unneeded risks. University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston researchers describe a practical patient-centered approach to managing dietary supplement use in cancer care in a review article.

UTMB researchers uncover powerful new class of weapons in the war on cancer
(University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston) An interdisciplinary team of researchers from the University of Texas Medical Branch, and Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University have identified small molecules that can represent a new class of anticancer drugs with a novel target for the treatment of lung cancer. These findings are detailed in Nature Communications. A PCT patent was jointly documented by these two Institutes for the invention.

Seaweed engineers build crustacean homes; old forests store new nitrogen
(Ecological Society of America) In this month's issue of Ecology, invasive seaweed shelters native crustaceans, mature forests store nitrogen in soil, and stream invertebrates aren't eating what we thought they were eating.

If you're over 60, drink up: Alcohol associated with better memory
(University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston) Researchers from the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston, University of Kentucky, and University of Maryland found that for people 60 and older who do not have dementia, light alcohol consumption during late life is associated with higher episodic memory -- the ability to recall memories of events.

University Hospitals Neurological Institute earns Gold Center of Excellence designation
(University Hospitals Case Medical Center) University Hospitals Neurological Institute was designated as a Gold Center of Excellence and featured as a top performing center in a white paper by NeuStrategy, Inc.

New insights on carbonic acid in water
(DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory) A new study by Berkeley Lab researchers provides valuable new insight into aqueous carbonic acid with important implications for both geological and biological concerns.

Finally: A missing link between vitamin D and prostate cancer
(University of Colorado Denver) A University of Colorado Cancer Center study recently published in the journal Prostate offers compelling evidence that inflammation may be the link between vitamin D and prostate cancer. Specifically, the study shows that the gene GDF-15, known to be upregulated by vitamin D, is notably absent in samples of human prostate cancer driven by inflammation.

A real-time tracking system developed to monitor dangerous bacteria inside the body
(Johns Hopkins Medicine) Combining a PET scanner with a new chemical tracer that selectively tags specific types of bacteria, Johns Hopkins researchers working with mice report they have devised a way to detect and monitor in real time infections with dangerous Gram-negative bacteria. These increasingly drug-resistant bacteria are responsible for a range of diseases, including fatal pneumonias and various bloodstream or solid-organ infections acquired in and outside the hospital.

Paralyzed patients have weaker bones and a higher risk of fractures than expected
(Worcester Polytechnic Institute) People paralyzed by spinal cord injuries lose mechanical strength in their leg bones faster, and more significantly, than previously believed, putting them at greater risk for fractures from minor stresses, according to a study by researchers at Worcester Polytechnic Institute. The results suggest that physicians should begin therapies for such patients sooner to maintain bone mass and strength, and should think beyond standard bone density tests when assessing fracture risk in osteoporosis patients.

New ALS associated gene identified using innovative strategy
(University of Massachusetts Medical School) Using an innovative exome sequencing strategy, a team of international scientists led by John Landers, PhD, at the University of Massachusetts Medical School has shown that TUBA4A, the gene encoding the Tubulin Alpha 4A protein, is associated with familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, a fatal neurological disorder also known as Lou Gehrig's Disease.

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