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Latest and Breaking Nanotechnology News

Massachusetts General study reveals gene expression patterns in pancreatic CTCs
(Massachusetts General Hospital) Analysis of circulating tumor cells in a mouse model of pancreatic cancer identified distinct patterns of gene expression in several groups of CTCs, including significant differences from the primary tumor that may contribute to the ability to generate metastases. The Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center investigators identified several different classes of pancreatic CTCs and found unexpected factors that may prove to be targets for improved treatment of the deadly tumor.

New chip promising for tumor-targeting research
(Purdue University) Researchers have developed a chip capable of simulating a tumor's 'microenvironment' and plan to use the new system to test the effectiveness of nanoparticles and drugs that target cancer.

Graphene imperfections key to creating hypersensitive 'electronic nose'
(University of Illinois at Chicago) Researchers have discovered a way to create a highly sensitive chemical sensor based on the crystalline flaws in graphene sheets. The imperfections have unique electronic properties that the researchers were able to exploit to increase sensitivity to absorbed gas molecules by 300 times.

Engineers show light can play seesaw at the nanoscale
(University of Minnesota) University of Minnesota electrical engineering researchers have developed a unique nanoscale device that for the first time demonstrates mechanical transportation of light. The discovery could have major implications for creating faster and more efficient optical devices for computation and communication.

New 'star' shaped molecule breakthrough
(University of Manchester) Scientists at The University of Manchester have generated a new star-shaped molecule made up of interlocking rings, which is the most complex of its kind ever created.

Smallest possible diamonds form ultra-thin nanothreads
(Penn State) For the first time, scientists have discovered how to produce ultra-thin 'diamond nanothreads' that promise extraordinary properties, including strength and stiffness greater than that of today's strongest nanotubes and polymers. The threads have a structure that has never been seen before.

Uncovering the forbidden side of molecules
(University of Basel) Researchers at the University of Basel in Switzerland have succeeded in observing the 'forbidden' infrared spectrum of a charged molecule for the first time. These extremely weak spectra offer perspectives for extremely precise measurements of molecular properties and may also contribute to the development of molecular clocks and quantum technology. The results were published in the scientific journal Nature Physics.

Graphene sensor tracks down cancer biomarkers
(Institute of Physics) An ultrasensitive biosensor made from the wonder material graphene has been used to detect molecules that indicate an increased risk of developing cancer.

Toward optical chips
(Massachusetts Institute of Technology) In the next issue of the journal Nano Letters, researchers from MIT's departments of Physics and of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science will describe a new technique for building MoS2 light emitters tuned to different frequencies, an essential requirement for optoelectronic chips. Since thin films of material can also be patterned onto sheets of plastic, the same work could point toward thin, flexible, bright, color displays.

Nature's designs inspire research into new light-based technologies
(SPIE--International Society for Optics and Photonics) Solutions required for progress on the frontiers of photonics technology are close at hand: in nature, when viewed through the perspective of engineer, says Montana State University optics researcher Joseph Shaw. Along with Rongguang Liang of the University of Arizona, Shaw chaired the 'Light in Nature' conference presenting new research in the field last month at SPIE Optics + Photonics and being published in the SPIE Digital Library.

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