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Latest and Breaking Nanotechnology News

Carnegie Mellon chemists create nanofibers using unprecedented new method
(Carnegie Mellon University) Researchers from Carnegie Mellon University have developed a novel method for creating self-assembled protein/polymer nanostructures that are reminiscent of fibers found in living cells. The work offers a promising new way to fabricate materials for drug delivery and tissue engineering applications.

Free pores for molecule transport
(Karlsruher Institut fr Technologie (KIT) ) Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) can take up gases similar to a sponge that soaks up liquids. Hence, these highly porous materials are suited for storing hydrogen or greenhouse gases. However, loading of many MOFs is inhibited by barriers. Scientists of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology now report in Nature Communications that the barriers are caused by corrosion of the MOF surface. This can be prevented by water-free synthesis and storing strategies.

Chemists demonstrate 'bricks-and-mortar' assembly of new molecular structures
(Indiana University) Chemists at Indiana University Bloomington have described the self-assembly of large, symmetrical molecules in bricks-and-mortar fashion, a development with potential value for the field of organic electronic devices such as field-effect transistors and photovoltaic cells.

NSF grant to Wayne State supports new concept for manufacturing nanoscale devices
(Wayne State University - Office of the Vice President for Research) According to the National Science Foundation, nanotechnology is the creation and utilization of functional materials, devices, and systems with novel properties and functions. A major bottleneck in scaling up nanotechnology is the lack of manufacturing methods that connect different functional materials into one device. A research team led by Dr. Guangzhao Mao, professor of chemical engineering and materials science at Wayne State University, is seeking answers to this problem.

Revolutionary microshutter technology hurdles significant challenges
(NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center) NASA technologists have hurdled a number of significant technological challenges in their quest to improve an already revolutionary observing technology originally created for the James Webb Space Telescope.

A new way to make microstructured surfaces
(Massachusetts Institute of Technology) A team of researchers has created a new way of manufacturing microstructured surfaces that have novel three-dimensional textures. These surfaces, made by self-assembly of carbon nanotubes, could exhibit a variety of useful properties -- including controllable mechanical stiffness and strength, or the ability to repel water in a certain direction.

Tough foam from tiny sheets
(Rice University) Tough, ultralight foam of atom-thick sheets can be made to any size and shape through a chemical process invented at Rice University.

Optimum inertial self-propulsion design for snowman-like nanorobot
(Springer) Swimming microorganisms are subjected to relatively small inertial forces compared to the viscous forces exerted by the surrounding fluid. Such low-level inertia makes self-propulsion a major challenge. Scientists have found that the direction of propulsion made possible by such inertia is opposite to that induced by a viscoelastic fluid. This study published in EPJ E could help optimise the design of self-propelled micro- and nano-scale artificial swimming machines to improve their mobility in medical applications.

New method provides researchers with efficient tool for tagging proteins
(Aarhus University) With a new method, researchers use a piece of DNA engineered to bind to metal ions. Using this 'control stick,' they direct another piece of DNA to a metal binding site on the protein.

The quantum Cheshire cat: Scientists separate a particle from its properties
(Chapman University) The quantum Cheshire cat: Can a particle be separated from its properties? On July 29, the prestigious journal, Nature Communications, published the results of the first Cheshire Cat experiment, separating a neutron from its magnetic field, conducted by Chapman University in Orange, Calif., and Vienna University of Technology.

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