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Latest and Breaking Nanotechnology News

Department of Defense awards nearly $6 million grant to further bone fracture repair research
(Houston Methodist) A collaborative research team led by scientists at Houston Methodist is one step closer to developing technologies that could help mend broken bones faster. The Department of Defense awarded close to $6 million to the Houston Methodist Research Institute for an initiative aimed at studying two new materials to repair complex fractures in long bones.

Double the (quantum) fun
(American Institute of Physics) A group of researchers in Japan is exploring the behavior of a certain type of SET (single-electron transistor) made from two quantum dots, which are bits of material so small they start to exhibit quantum properties. The group has produced a detailed analysis of the electrical characteristics of the so-called double-quantum-dot SETs, which could help researchers design better devices to manipulate single electrons. They report their findings in the Journal of Applied Physics.

We Robot 2016 April 1-2 at University of Miami
(University of Miami) We Robot 2016 is a conference at the intersection of the law, policy, and technology of robotics, to be held in Coral Gables, Florida on April 1-2, 2016. We Robot is now in its fifth year, returning to the University of Miami School of Law after being hosted by the University of Washington Stanford Law School last April. The conference website is

Professor Nanfang Yu wins DARPA Young Faculty Award for optoelectronics research
(Columbia University School of Engineering and Applied Science) Columbia Engineering applied physics professor Nanfang Yu has won the prestigious DARPA Young Faculty Award, which will support his work on metasurface-based flat optical modulators, using strong interactions between light and 2-D-structured materials to control light at will. Yu hopes to demonstrate spatial light modulators -- high-speed and lightweight optoelectronic devices -- that are crucial for light detection and ranging, technology useful for a wide range of applications, including remote sensing, navigation, and surveillance.

ORNL researchers find 'greener' way to assemble materials for solar applications
(DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory) The efficiency of solar cells depends on precise engineering of polymers that assemble into films 1,000 times thinner than a human hair. Today, formation of that polymer assembly requires solvents that can harm the environment, but scientists at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory have found a 'greener' way to control the assembly of photovoltaic polymers in water using a surfactant -- a detergent-like molecule -- as a template.

Graphene teams up with two-dimensional crystals for faster data communications
(ICFO-The Institute of Photonic Sciences) In the recent work published today in Nature Nanotechnology, the research group led by professor at ICFO Frank Koppens has shown that a two-dimensional crystal, combined with graphene, has the capability to detect optical pulses with a response faster than 10 picoseconds, while maintaining a high efficiency.

Big range of behaviors for tiny graphene pores
(Massachusetts Institute of Technology) Researchers at MIT have created tiny pores in single sheets of graphene that have an array of preferences and characteristics similar to those of ion channels in living cells.

Observing the unobservable: Researchers measure electron orbitals of molecules in 3-D
(Forschungszentrum Juelich) Electron orbitals provide information on the whereabouts of the electrons in atoms and molecules. Scientists from the University of Graz, Forschungszentrum Jlich, and the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt have now succeeded in experimentally recording these structures in all three dimensions. They achieved this by further developing a method they had already applied two years ago to make these orbitals visible in two dimensions. Their findings have now been published in the scientific journal Nature Communications.

Molecular nanoribbons as electronic highways
(Umea University) Physicists at Ume University have, together with researchers at UC Berkeley, USA, developed a method to synthesise a unique and novel type of material which resembles a graphene nanoribbon but in molecular form. This material could be important for the further development of organic solar cells. The results have been published in the scientific journal ACS Nano.

Electron tomography with 3,487 images in 3.5 seconds
(Forschungszentrum Juelich) Scientists from the Ernst Ruska-Centre used a transmission electron microscope to record almost 3,500 images in 3.5 seconds for the reconstruction of a 3-D electron tomogram. Previously, 10 to 60 minutes and a ten-fold greater electron dose were required to record such image sequences. The new capability is particularly suitable for examining cells, bacteria, viruses and dynamic processes, such as chemical reactions and electronic switching phenomena. The findings have been published in Scientific Reports.

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