How many GZZTs
can your brain resists?

⇑ Your Ad Here ⇑

._|.<(+_+)>.|_.

Latest and Breaking Nanotechnology News

UT Arlington researcher's device could detect vapors in environment or a person's breath
(University of Texas at Arlington) A University of Texas at Arlington researcher has received a three-year, $400,369 National Science Foundation grant to build a handheld device that could analyze a person's breath to reveal whether certain dangerous gasses are present that need more immediate medical attention.

Special UO microscope captures defects in nanotubes
(University of Oregon) University of Oregon chemists have devised a way to see the internal structures of electronic waves trapped in carbon nanotubes by external electrostatic charges.

Could I squeeze by you?
(DOE/Ames Laboratory) Scientists at the US Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory have developed deeper understanding of the ideal design for mesoporous nanoparticles used in catalytic reactions, such as hydrocarbon conversion to biofuels. The research will help determine the optimal diameter of channels within the nanoparticles to maximize catalytic output.

Detecting cancer earlier is goal of rutgers-developed medical imaging technology
(Rutgers University) A new medical imaging method being developed at Rutgers University could help physicians detect cancer and other diseases earlier than before, speeding treatment and reducing the need for invasive, time-consuming biopsies. The potentially lifesaving technique uses nanotechnology and shortwave infrared light to reveal small cancerous tumors and cardiovascular lesions deep inside the body.

Queen's in international 'attosecond' science breakthrough
(Queen's University Belfast) Scientists from Queen's University Belfast have been involved in a groundbreaking discovery in the area of experimental physics that has implications for understanding how radiotherapy kills cancer cells, among other things.

See-through, one-atom-thick, carbon electrodes powerful tool to study brain disorders
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) A graphene, one-atom-thick microelectrode now solves a major problem for investigators looking at brain circuitry. Pinning down the details of how individual neural circuits operate in epilepsy and other brain disorders requires real-time observation of their locations, firing patterns, and other factors.

Springer and Tsinghua University Press award Nano Research Award
(Springer Science+Business Media ) Professor Charles M. Lieber -- the Mark Hyman Professor of Chemistry at Harvard University -- has been presented with the first-ever Tsinghua University Press-Springer Nano Research Award.

Winning by losing
(Vienna University of Technology) The more energy you put in, the more light you get out -- this general rule does not apply to the coupled laser systems studied at the Vienna University of Technology and Washington University in St. Louis. Increasing the energy can switch the laser off, reducing its energy may switch it on. Paradoxical laser coupling effects could be used for opto-electronics or opto-mechanics.

Elliot L. Chaikof, M.D., Ph.D., elected to Institute of Medicine
(Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center) Elliot L. Chaikof, M.D., Ph.D., Chair of the Roberta and Stephen R. Weiner Department of Surgery at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, has been elected to the Institute of Medicine.

1980s American aircraft helps quantum technology take flight
(University of Sydney) The X-29, an American experimental aircraft has inspired University of Sydney quantum computing researchers in a development which will bring the technology out of the lab.

Did you find this helpful?

Gzzt.org is an honest, human-edited directory of free online services and useful sites. We are about to celebrate 20 years in Internet. We would be very happy if you buy us a coffee.

Thank you!


{top}