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Latest and Breaking Nanotechnology News

New method allows for greater variation in band gap tunability
(Northwestern University) By manipulating the ordered arrangement of atoms in layered complex oxide materials, Northwestern University's James Rondinelli has found a way to control their electronic band gaps, which determines the electrical behavior of the material and how it interacts with light.

UT Arlington awarded DOE grant to develop sensors for real-time evaluation of boilers
(University of Texas at Arlington) A University of Texas at Arlington engineering professor is developing a distributed wireless antenna sensor system to monitor conditions of coal-fired boilers that will lead to making the units safer, more efficient and eventually producing better designed units.

DNA nanoswitches reveal how life's molecules connect
(Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard) 'Bio-molecular interaction analysis, a cornerstone of biomedical research, is traditionally accomplished using equipment that can cost hundreds of thousands of dollars,' said Wyss Associate Faculty member Wesley P. Wong, Ph.D., senior author of study. 'Rather than develop a new instrument, we've created a nanoscale tool made from strands of DNA that can detect and report how molecules behave, enabling biological measurements to be made by almost anyone, using only common and inexpensive laboratory reagents.'

PNNL recognized for moving biofuel, chemical analysis innovations to market
(DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory) Developing renewable fuel from wet algae and enabling analysis of complex liquids are two of the latest innovations Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has successfully driven to the market with the help of commercial partners.

Crystal light: New light-converting materials point to cheaper, more efficient solar power
(University of Toronto Faculty of Applied Science & Engineering) Engineers have shone new light on an emerging family of solar-absorbing materials that could clear the way for cheaper and more efficient solar panels and LEDs. The materials, called perovskites, are particularly good at absorbing visible light, but had never been thoroughly studied in their purest form: as perfect single crystals. Using a new technique, researchers grew large, pure perovskite crystals and studied how electrons move through the material as light is converted to electricity.

Made-in-Singapore rapid test kit detects dengue antibodies from saliva
(Biomedical Sciences Institutes (BMSI)) Finding out whether you have been infected with dengue may soon be as easy as spitting into a rapid test kit. The Institute of Bioengineering and Nanotechnology of A*STAR has developed a paper-based disposable device that will allow dengue-specific antibodies to be detected easily from saliva within 20 minutes. This device is currently undergoing further development for commercialization.

Demystifying nanocrystal solar cells
(ETH Zurich) ETH researchers have developed a comprehensive model to explain how electrons flow inside new types of solar cells made of tiny crystals. The model allows for a better understanding of such cells and may help to increase their efficiency.

Award-winning research on DNA probes just published in Canadian Journal of Chemistry
(Canadian Science Publishing (NRC Research Press)) The 2014 Fred Beamish Award was awarded to professor Juewen Liu (Department of Chemistry, University of Waterloo). The Award Lecture titled 'Lanthanide-dependent RNA-cleaving DNAzymes as metal biosensors' is published today in the Canadian Journal of Chemistry.

Nanoscale mirrored cavities amplify, connect quantum memories
(DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory) Constructing tiny 'mirrors' to trap light increases the efficiency with which photons can pick up and transmit information about electronic spin states -- which is essential for scaling up quantum memories for functional quantum computing systems and networks.

Researchers use sound to slow down, speed up, and block light
(University of Illinois College of Engineering) Researchers from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have experimentally demonstrated, for the first time, the phenomenon of Brillouin Scattering Induced Transparency (BSIT), which can be used to slow down, speed up, and block light in an optical waveguide. The BSIT phenomenon permits light to travel in the forward direction while light traveling in the backward direction is strongly absorbed. This non-reciprocal behavior is essential for building isolators and circulators.

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