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Latest and Breaking Nanotechnology News

NTU Singapore lights up photonics research with $100 million institute
(Nanyang Technological University) The next generation ultra-fast Internet or ground-breaking electronic circuits powered by light instead of electricity could very well be built on research done at Nanyang Technological University (NTU Singapore). NTU Singapore is partnering the University of Southampton, UK to set up the new institute.

A new generation of storage -- ring
(International Union of Crystallography) The MAX IV facility, currently under construction in Lund, Sweden, is the first of a new generation of storage-ring-based synchrotron light sources which employ a multibend achromat lattice to reach emittances in the few hundred pm rad range in a circumference of a few hundred meters.

Lord of the microrings
(DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory) Berkeley Lab researchers report a significant breakthrough in laser technology with the development of a unique microring laser cavity that can produce single-mode lasing on demand. This advance holds ramifications for a wide range of optoelectronic applications including metrology and interferometry, data storage and communications, and high-resolution spectroscopy.

Biology meets geometry
(University of California - Santa Barbara) Architecture imitates life, at least when it comes to those spiral ramps in multistory parking garages. Stacked and connecting parallel levels, the ramps are replications of helical structures found in a ubiquitous membrane structure in the cells of the body.

UTA researcher uses microscaffolding injections to mend cartilage, prevent osteoarthritis
(University of Texas at Arlington) A UT Arlington bioengineering professor has received a $1.04 million grant from the US Army that aims to regenerate cartilage tissue and reduce osteoarthritis using a patient's own stem cells, spurred through the injection of microscaffolding made of biodegradable polymers.

Ion adsorption matter in biology
(Springer) Biological membranes are mainly composed of lipid bilayers. Gaining a better understanding of adsorption of solution ions onto lipid membranes helps clarify functional processes in biological cells. A new study, published in EPJ E, provides a quantitative description of the equilibria between lipid membranes and surrounding solution ions. In addition to shedding some light on biological processes, these results could also have implications for, among other things, the future development of medical diagnostics.

'Nanomotor lithography' answers call for affordable, simpler device manufacturing
(University of California - San Diego) What does it take to fabricate electronic and medical devices tinier than a fraction of a human hair? Nanoengineers at the University of California, San Diego recently invented a new method of lithography in which nanoscale robots swim over the surface of light-sensitive material to create complex surface patterns that form the sensors and electronics components on nanoscale devices. Their research was published recently in the journal Nature Communications.

Nanosafety research: The quest for the gold standard
(Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology (EMPA)) Empa toxicologist Harald Krug has lambasted his colleagues in the journal Angewandte Chemie. He evaluated several thousand studies on the risks associated with nanoparticles and discovered no end of shortcomings: poorly prepared experiments and results that don't carry any clout. Instead of merely leveling criticism, however, Empa is also developing new standards for such experiments within an international network.

CU Denver study says upgrading infrastructure could reduce flood damage
(University of Colorado Denver) The severe flooding that devastated a wide swath of Colorado last year might have been less destructive if the bridges, roads and other infrastructure had been upgraded or modernized, according to a new study from the University of Colorado Denver.

Physicists' simple solution for quantum technology challenge
(University of Sussex) A solution to one of the key challenges in the development of quantum technologies has been proposed by University of Sussex physicists.

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