How many GZZTs
can your brain resists?

._|.<(+_+)>.|_.

Latest and Breaking Oceanography News

Distribution of fish on the northeast US shelf influenced by both fishing and climate
(NOAA Northeast Fisheries Science Center) Scientists studying the distribution of four commercial and recreational fish stocks in Northeast US waters have found that climate change can have major impacts on the distribution of fish, but the effects of fishing can be just as important and occur on a more immediate time scale. The four species studied -- black sea bass, scup, summer flounder, and southern New England/Mid-Atlantic Bight winter flounder -- have varied in abundance and have experienced heavy fishing pressure at times over the past 40 years.

Coral reveals long-term link between Pacific winds, global climate
(National Center for Atmospheric Research/University Corporation for Atmospheric Research) New research indicates that shifts in Pacific trade winds played a key role in twentieth century climate variation and are likely again influencing global temperatures. The study, led by NCAR and the University of Arizona, uses a novel method of analyzing coral chemistry to reveal winds from a century ago.

Trade winds ventilate the tropical oceans
(Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel (GEOMAR)) Long-term observations indicate that the oxygen minimum zones in the tropical oceans have expanded in recent decades. The reason is still unknown. Now scientists at the GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel and the Collaborative Research Centre 754 'Climate - Biogeochemical Interactions in the Tropical Ocean' have found an explanation with the help of model simulations: A natural fluctuation of the trade winds. The study has been published in the international journal Geophysical Research Letters.

New challenges for ocean acidification research
(Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel (GEOMAR)) To continue its striking development, ocean acidification research needs to bridge between its diverging branches towards an integrated assessment. This is the conclusion drawn by Professor Ulf Riebesell from the Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel and Dr. Jean-Pierre Gattuso from the French Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique and Universite Pierre et Marie Curie. In a commentary in the journal Nature Climate Change, the two internationally renowned experts reflect on the lessons learned from ocean acidification research and highlight future challenges.

NOAA establishes 'tipping points' for sea level rise related flooding
(NOAA Headquarters) By 2050, a majority of US coastal areas are likely to be threatened by 30 or more days of flooding each year due to dramatically accelerating impacts from sea level rise, according to a new NOAA study, published today in the American Geophysical Union's online peer-reviewed journal Earth's Future.

Australia's coastal observation network may aid in understanding of extreme ocean events
(PLOS) A network of nine reference sites off the Australian coast is providing the latest physical, chemical, and biological information to help scientists better understand Australia's coastal seas.

Syracuse biologist reveals how whales may 'sing' for their supper
(Syracuse University) Humpback whales have a trick or two, when it comes to finding a quick snack at the bottom of the ocean. Even in the dark.Susan Parks, assistant professor of Biology in Syracuse University's College of Arts and Sciences, in collaboration with a consortium of other researchers, has been studying these unique feeding behaviors. Her research emphasizes the importance of specific auditory cues that these mammoth creatures emit, as they search the deep ocean for their prey.

NOAA-NASA's Suomi NPP satellite watching Cyclone Bakung's remnants
(NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center) The remnants of Tropical Cyclone Bakung continue to linger in the Southern Indian Ocean, and NOAA-NASA's Suomi NPP satellite is one satellite keeping an eye on the storm for possible re-development.

Glacier beds can get slipperier at higher sliding speeds
(Iowa State University) Using the Iowa State University Sliding Simulator, Iowa State glaciologists Lucas Zoet and Neal Iverson have found that as a glacier's sliding speed increases, the bed beneath the glacier can grow slipperier. That laboratory finding could help researchers make better predictions of glacier response to climate change and the corresponding sea-level rise. The research results were just published in the Journal of Glaciology.

Breakthrough capability keeps subs, ships on safe track
(Office of Naval Research) Interactive software that can dramatically cut the time it takes to plan safe submarine missions is crossing over to the surface fleet and is being installed this month on the guided-missile cruiser USS Mobile Bay (CG 53).

Did you find this helpful?

Gzzt.org is an honest, human-edited directory of free online services and useful sites. We are about to celebrate 20 years in Internet. We would be very happy if you buy us a coffee.

Thank you!


{top}