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Latest and Breaking Science Policy News

Harnessing error-prone chips
(Massachusetts Institute of Technology) A new system would allow programmers to easily trade computational accuracy for energy savings.

Dartmouth study finds restoring wetlands can lessen soil sinkage, greenhouse gas emissions
(Dartmouth College) Restoring wetlands can help reduce or reverse soil subsidence and reduce greenhouse gas emissions, according to research in California's Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta by Dartmouth College researchers and their colleagues.

University of Tennessee study finds saving lonely species is important for the environment
(University of Tennessee at Knoxville) Joe Bailey looked at endemic eucalyptus found in Tasmania. They discovered that these rare species have developed unique characteristics to survive, and that these characteristics may also impact the survival of its neighbors in the ecosystem.

Young adults ages 18 to 26 should be viewed as separate subpopulation in policy and research
(National Academy of Sciences) Young adults ages 18-26 should be viewed as a separate subpopulation in policy and research, because they are in a critical period of development when successes or failures could strongly affect the trajectories of their lives, says a new report from the Institute of Medicine and National Research Council.

CHEST lung cancer experts present policy statement to CMS Committee on Coverage
(American College of Chest Physicians) As the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services Committee on Coverage studies the decision to cover lung cancer screening for eligible individuals, today's Online First section of the journal CHEST published Components for High Quality Lung Cancer Screening: American College of Chest Physicians and American Thoracic Society Policy Statement.

Female frogs modify offspring development depending on reproduction date
(FECYT - Spanish Foundation for Science and Technology) Global warming is altering the reproduction of plants and animals, notably accelerating the date when reproduction and other life processes occur. A study by the University of Uppsala, including the participation of Spanish researcher Germn Orizaola, has discovered that some amphibians are capable of making their offspring grow at a faster rate if they have been born later due to the climate.

Elsevier announces the winner of the 5th Ahmed Zewail Prize in Molecular Sciences
(Elsevier) Elsevier, a world-leading provider of scientific, technical and medical information products and services, and the editors of the leading international journal Chemical Physics Letters are pleased to announce the winner of the 5th Ahmed Zewail Prize in Molecular Sciences. The award goes to Professor Sir John Meurig Thomas from the University of Cambridge, UK for his outstanding contributions to the fundamental understanding of the structures of solids and development and application of the concept of single-site heterogeneous catalysis.

Patents for humanity: Special edition of Technology and Innovation
(University of South Florida (USF Innovation)) The current special issue of Technology and Innovation is devoted to patents that benefit people around the world who live with limited resources, in challenging environments, and are in need of better access to basic needs and improved standards of living, health and infrastructure. It includes original articles from winners of the 2013 USPTO Patents for Humanity Awards, aimed at rewarding innovators for deploying patented technologies to address humanitarian needs.

Reef-builders with a sense of harmony
(Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel (GEOMAR)) Cold-water corals of the species Lophelia pertusa are able to fuse skeletons of genetically distinct individuals. On dives with JAGO, a research submersible stationed at GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel, scientists from Scotland and Germany made the first-ever discovery of branches of different colors that had flawlessly merged. The ability to fuse supports the reef stability and thus contributes to the success of corals as reef-builders of the deep sea.

Same votes, different voting districts would alter election results in NC
(Duke University) Researchers have developed a mathematical model that shows how changes in congressional voting districts affect election outcomes. Focusing on the last election, they show the outcome of the 2012 US House of Representatives elections in North Carolina would have been very different had the state's congressional districts been drawn with only the legal requirements of redistricting in mind. The researchers hope the study will bolster calls for redistricting reform in 2016.

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