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Latest and Breaking Science Policy News

Seaweed engineers build crustacean homes; old forests store new nitrogen
(Ecological Society of America) In this month's issue of Ecology, invasive seaweed shelters native crustaceans, mature forests store nitrogen in soil, and stream invertebrates aren't eating what we thought they were eating.

NIST's Cloud Computing Roadmap details research requirements and action plans
(National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST)) NIST has published the final version of the US Government Cloud Computing Technology Roadmap, Volumes I and II. The roadmap focuses on strategic and tactical objectives to support the federal government's accelerated adoption of cloud computing.

SF State awarded $17 million by NIH to enhance workforce diversity in biomedical research
(San Francisco State University) SF State has been awarded $17.04 million to address issues of workforce diversity in biomedical research, the National Institutes of Health announced. The effort is called SF BUILD, which stands for Building Infrastructure Leading to Diversity. Professors in biology, chemistry/biochemistry, psychology and other fields at SF State working on the project seek to upend presuppositions about members of minority communities -- that they may not have the aptitude or background to excel in the sciences.

Baker Institute paper: Data indicate there is no immigration crisis
(Rice University) Is there an 'immigration crisis' on the US-Mexico border? Not according to an examination of historical immigration data, according to a new paper from Rice University's Baker Institute for Public Policy.

The Rockefeller University Press offers free access to books
(Rockefeller University Press) The Rockefeller University Press has expanded access to its book collection, with nearly 50 titles available for free download in multiple e-book formats at books.rupress.org. The collection dates back to 1959 and includes works by Nobel and Pulitzer Prize-winning authors.

Individual metropolises now global political players
(Uppsala University) By providing the infrastructure that connects global flows and financial systems, major cities have increased their political power alongside the nation-states. In some cases, they are pursuing their own foreign policy in several areas. In her Ph.D. thesis Kristin Ljungkvist, a researcher in housing and urban affairs, has studied the effects of this development and argues that certain risks should be heeded.

Indiana Project screenings show need for more mental health services in youth detention
(Indiana University) Indiana is at the forefront of providing mental health screening and services to juvenile offenders, but more efforts are needed to improve the services provided to detained youths, according to Indiana University School of Medicine research findings published in the October issue of the American Journal of Public Health.

Global consumption an increasingly significant driver of tropical deforestation
(Chalmers University of Technology) International trade with agricultural and wood products is an increasingly important driver of tropical deforestation. More than a third of recent deforestation can be tied to production of beef, soy, palm oil and timber. 'The trend is clear, the drivers of deforestation have been globalized and commercialized,' says assistant professor Martin Persson, Chalmers University of Technology.

Recently discovered microbe is key player in climate change
(University of Arizona) Scientists have discovered how an invisible menagerie of microbes in permafrost soils acts as global drivers of Earth processes such as climate via gas exchange between soils and the atmosphere. These findings will help climate modelers more accurately predict Earth's future climate.

Brain simulation raises questions
(Uppsala University) What does it mean to simulate the human brain? Why is it important to do so? And is it even possible to simulate the brain separately from the body it exists in? These questions are discussed in a new paper published in the scientific journal Neuron today.

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