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Latest and Breaking Space Science News

Dark matter even darker than once thought
(ESA/Hubble Information Centre) Astronomers using observations from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope and NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory have studied how dark matter in clusters of galaxies behaves when the clusters collide. The results, published in the journal Science on March 27, 2015, show that dark matter interacts with itself even less than previously thought, and narrows down the options for what this mysterious substance might be.

Science: Theory of the strong interaction verified
(Forschungszentrum Juelich) Eighty years after the discovery of the neutron, a team of physicists from France, Germany, and Hungary headed by Zoltn Fodor, a researcher from Wuppertal, has finally calculated the tiny neutron-proton mass difference. The findings, which have been published in Science, are considered a milestone by many physicists and confirm the theory of the strong interaction. As one of the most powerful computers in the world, JUQUEEN at Forschungszentrum Jlich was decisive for the simulation.

2015 Joint Assembly: News media registration open; reserve hotel room now
(American Geophysical Union) More than 2,000 researchers are expected to present their latest research findings in the Earth and space sciences at the 2015 Joint Assembly being held May 3-7 in Montreal. The meeting will bring together researchers from the American Geophysical Union, Canadian Geophysical Union, Geological Association of Canada, and Mineral Association of Canada.

Galaxy clusters collide; dark matter still a mystery
(Ecole Polytechnique Fdrale de Lausanne) When galaxy clusters collide, their dark matters pass through each other, with very little interaction. Deepening the mystery, a study by scientists at EPFL and the University of Edinburgh challenges the idea that dark matter is composed of particles.

Best view yet of dusty cloud passing galactic center black hole
(ESO) The best observations so far of the dusty gas cloud G2 confirm that it made its closest approach to the supermassive black hole at the centre of the Milky Way in May 2014 and has survived the experience. The new result from ESO's Very Large Telescope shows that the object appears not to have been significantly stretched. It is most likely to be a young star with a massive core that is still accreting material.

Antarctic ice shelves rapidly thinning
(University of California - San Diego) A new study published by Science and led by Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego researchers has revealed that the thickness of Antarctica's floating ice shelves has recently decreased by as much as 18 percent in certain areas over nearly two decades, providing new insights on how the Antarctic ice sheet is responding to climate change. Data from nearly two decades of satellite missions have shown that the ice volume decline is accelerating.

Suzaku, Herschel link a black-hole 'wind' to a galactic gush of star-forming gas
(NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center) By combining observations from the Japan-led Suzaku X-ray satellite and the European Space Agency's infrared Herschel Space Observatory, scientists have connected a fierce 'wind' produced near a galaxy's monster black hole to an outward torrent of cold gas a thousand light-years across. The finding validates a long-suspected feedback mechanism enabling a supermassive black hole to influence the evolution of its host galaxy.

Ancient Martian lake system records 2 water-related events
(Brown University) Researchers from Brown University have completed a new analysis of an ancient Martian lake system in Jezero Crater, near the planet's equator. The study finds that the onslaught of water that filled the crater was one of at least two separate periods of water activity in the region surrounding Jezero.

A new spin on Saturn's peculiar rotation
(American Friends of Tel Aviv University) The precise measurement of Saturn's rotation has presented a great challenge to scientists, as different parts of this sweltering ball of hydrogen and helium rotate at different speeds whereas its rotation axis and magnetic pole are aligned. A new method devised by a Tel Aviv University researcher proposes a new determination of Saturn's rotation period and offers insight into the internal structure of the planet, its weather patterns, and the way it formed.

Unexplained warm layer discovered in Venus' atmosphere
(Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology) A group of Russian, European and American scientists have found a warm layer in Venus' atmosphere, the nature of which is still unknown. The researchers made the discovery when compiling a temperature map of the upper atmosphere on the planet's night side based on the data collected by the Venus Express probe.

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